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Wendolin lost his partner to covid

Families across Mexico moderated Christmas celebrations to prevent further spread of the coronavirus, while others spent the holidays alone.

Families across Mexico moderated Christmas celebrations to prevent further spread of the coronavirus, while others spent the holidays alone.

MEXICO CITY.

Families across Mexico moderated Christmas celebrations to prevent further spread of the coronavirus, while others spent the holidays alone after losing loved ones to the epidemic that has left more than 120,000 dead in the country.

In populous Mexico City, the small apartment of 33-year-old street vendor Wendolin García was decorated with cheery colored lights and a Christmas tree, but she spent Christmas Eve alone after the pandemic claimed the life of her partner, his in-laws and a brother-in-law with whom he lived.

“We had a lot of plans,” Garcia said, wiping her tears, standing next to an altar of photographs of her deceased relatives. “This coming year we were going to get married, but it was no longer possible.”

Meanwhile, Marcela Hernández and her husband, Juan Carlos Roque, held a modest Christmas Eve dinner with their two children at their home in the capital’s suburbs.

Both parents are doctors and one of their sons is also studying medicine. They decided to make a video call to the rest of their relatives, rather than risk exposing them.

“It is very sad at this time that many families do not have their mother, their father, their brothers, their children or many of all of them. Families totally dismembered,” said Roque, who on Thursday received one of the first doses of the coronavirus vaccine administered in Mexico.

jcp

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