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Nursing Alice desperately in BILD – “Have you forgotten us here?”

Report on the flood of death in Germany: J. ANDA, C. BECKER, F. BEQIRI, H. DENK, JH DOBERS, M. ENGELBERG, M. FILIPOVIC, J. FIRLEJ, Pv FRANKENBERG, T. GAUTIER, A. GERAY, P HACKEMANN, Y. HÜBNER, C. JÖSCH, M. KIEWEL, I. KLEE, T. KLEIN, A. KRZYKOWSKI, S. LAURA, T. LAUX, J. MAHNKE, P. MÜLLER, N. NÖLKEN, K. ORTMANN , S. PRENGEL, C. REICHWEIN, T. RÖTHEMEIER, M. RUFFLER, B. SCHILZ, M. SCHINKEL, K. SOCHER, D. SOIBEL, N. STAMPFLMEIER, R. STANGER, D. SUKOW, A. TALASH, P WILKE, L. WITTKOWSKI and L. ZANDER

Mayschoß – The residents of Mayschoss have been worried for help for four days.

The electricity has failed, the access roads have been destroyed. Only a narrow forest path leads to the 1000-inhabitant village in the Ahr valley (Rhineland-Palatinate).

When BILD reporters fight their way into the flooded community on Sunday, Alice Dommerque (54) meets them. She is a nurse and says, trembling: “We’re all alone here.”

“We pump out the cellar, but the water keeps flowing”

Then she bursts into tears. When the flood flooded her sister and aunt’s house on Wednesday, she packed the bare minimums and drove to them. “My 80-year-old aunt spent 24 hours in the attic. The Bundeswehr brought us drinking water. But then the soldiers disappeared again. “

Since then, the family and the rest of the village have been on their own. Alice Dommerque is desperate: “Have we been forgotten? How are we supposed to fight the chaos alone? We pump out the cellar, but the water keeps flowing. “

“All papers are gone too”

Rubble and debris lie in the family’s once well-tended garden, and even a camper weighing several tons was washed up. Where he comes from – unclear. “We don’t even know whether there might even be dead people in there,” says Dommerque. And further: “You would need heavy equipment to remove all of this, but the big machines can’t get over the forest path. We don’t even have tractors to clear the paths. “

When night falls, the family lights candles and in the morning they wash themselves with rainwater. “It’s so terrible, we have nothing left,” says the nurse, “and all of our papers are gone.”

The first rescue workers finally reached the village yesterday afternoon. Four days after the disaster.

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