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Nashville Blast – Suspect feared 5G rays and gave his home to a 29-year-old

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Nashville Blast – Suspect feared 5G rays and gave his home to a 29-year-old

FBI and ATF (Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives) investigators investigate a house in Nashville.

FBI and ATF (Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives) investigators investigate a house in Nashville.

© Mark Humphrey / DPA

The Nashville assassin is believed to have blown himself up. He is said to have been obsessed with 5G conspiracy theories and transferred his real estate property before his death.

The prime suspect in the Nashville explosion appears to have planned his death. Weeks before the explosion, he gave houses worth almost 400,000 euros to a young mother. Beneficiary Michelle S. lives in Los Angeles. She says she didn’t know Anthony W., 63, had given her the property.

“In the state of Tennessee you can transfer property to someone else without their consent or signature or anything else,” S. told the British newspaper “Daily Mail”. “I didn’t buy the house, he just gave it to me without my knowledge. So it’s all very strange to me, that’s pretty much all I can say.” However, this is the second donation. Warner had given her another house earlier. However, S. did not want to tell the newspaper about her relationship with the suspect. She confirmed that the FBI had already contacted her.

Human tissue in the motor home

The Christmas morning explosion is now considered a suicide bombing as human remains were found at the scene. Officials also said they are not looking for a suspect. It can therefore be assumed that the perpetrator was in the mobile home in the explosion. Anthony W. has not yet been officially identified as the perpetrator. But according to “Newsweek”, the authorities want to cut back on his mother to determine whether the DNA matches the remains found at the crime scene.

The location in front of the AT&T office is no coincidence. The FBI is said to have received tips that W. was obsessed with conspiracy theories about 5G cellular technology. He believed that Americans should be spied on using 5G. W. worked as an IT specialist. The real estate agent Steve Fridrich said on local TV that W. had done IT work for him for years. Fridrich never noticed anything special about W. “Nice guy. He was such a technology guy – that is not meant negatively. He did his job and left. He didn’t bother anyone. He did his thing and left,” said Fridrich.

Odd neighbor

Police officers searched a house in a suburb in the southeast of the city. FBI investigator Douglas Korneski said at a press conference that he was “fairly confident” that the authorities would find the background to the incident and the culprit: “We just need time.” W. was described by his neighbors as a withdrawn “owl”. Tony Rodriguez lives in the second half of the duplex and told the Washington Post that he never spoke to him. He claimed that W. had posted “No Trespassing” signs around the house and RV, and was often seen tinkering with an antenna above the house. During the search of W’s house, the police are said to have seized a computer. Mayor John Cooper spoke of “catastrophic damage”. About 41 stores were damaged, he said. “The attack aimed at this time there was peace and hope to spread chaos and fear”.

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